I thought the story of Sun of Suns was well-told, but the fictional world was so implausible that I was distracted from the story. This is an air world inside an artificial shell, where there is no land or gravity. This raises all sorts of questions which Schroeder explains incompletely or not at all. He says that the people here farm free-floating clods of dirt, for example, but never explains where the dirt comes from. These people make most of their possessions out of wood that grows as floating trees, but they also have metal tools and weapons. So where does the metal come from with no land to mine? At one point the heroes knock loose iceberg-sized masses of ice that have collected on the shell-world's walls, and these bergs fall upon their enemies' ships. But why do the icebergs fall when nothing else in this weightless world does? Schroder is not without skill as a storyteller and creator of characters, and this tale does move along entertainingly, but for a reader like myself who wants plausible science in his science fiction, Sun of Suns is unsatisfying.

N13m4nd's rating:
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