Into the Wild

Into the Wild

Book - 1997
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l
lostaslipper
Jul 30, 2020

It would have been a great short story. Making it into a book was a stretch.

j
jujubee_123
Apr 02, 2020

My interest in this book peaked after I read a news article. The news article reported about a newlywed woman who had died trying to cross the Teklanika, she and her husband were trying to reach the abandoned bus on the other side of the river. I was wondering why these people would even attempt to see a this old bus, so I decided to read this book. I'm glad I decided to read it. It it well formatted and I would recommend to anyone who is curious, because it is an interesting tale.

ArapahoePatrick Jan 22, 2020

Christopher Mccandless's story is well known and widely mocked. After reading this account of his unfortunate journey I find him a much more empathetic person and sincerely relate to him in many ways. Who can't relate to the desire to be alone for a while?

YLPLTEENBOOKBLOG Aug 20, 2019

While I was initially skeptical of how interesting I would find Jon Krakauer’s non-fiction book, Into the Wild, I have to admit that I really enjoyed it. His book follows the true story of a young man, Christopher McCandless who ventured into the wild. It is easy to criticize that McCandless’s lack of preparation for his adventure, the author portrays him in a way that is likable and easy to identify with. I really appreciated that Krakauer brought in additional examples to the story to compare and contrast to McCandless’s adventure. I think it added a lot of insight into the story and his reasoning behind his journey. Emily, grade 12, of the Yorba Linda Teen Book Bloggers

r
RebelBelle13
Aug 05, 2019

I thought perhaps since I enjoyed Krakauer's other work, Into Thin Air, that I would also enjoy this. There are elements of this that were enjoyable, namely Krakauer's descriptive and immersive prose- his ability to dive deep into a situation or a life and explore it thoroughly without becoming repetitive. The other blessing here is that the book was short- just about 200 pages. This was key in my finishing the novel, as I don't think I could have read any more about the arrogant, self-absorbed, ignorant Chris McCandless. He acted as though he was too good for the world, and didn't appreciate the good life that his parents had struggled to provide him; their mistakes and misgivings aside. Who traipses into the Alaskan wilderness without a map and a compass? If he'd had a map, he would have survived. McCandless is woefully unprepared for his sojourn, and though he insists that he wants to make his journey solo, he relies quite a bit on strangers for the two years he is on the road. He just expects people to help him. The more I read about him, the more it made me angry.
It is unclear whether the author feels the same as the general public or not- since he peppers the novel with his own solo experiences. Is he in solidarity with McCandless? Thumbing his nose at him because he survived and McCandless didn't? Or is he pointing out that someone who is much more prepared and skilled could have made the journey and come out the other side? It's hard to say. I won't be recommending this one, simply based on the infuriating nature of the protagonist of the story.

d
dmessy
Jun 17, 2019

This book was a huge disappointment for me. Whatever this boneheaded, narcissistic youth was trying to prove is beyond me or any of his family or friends. He basically committed suicide. The author tried his best to make sense of it all but the end result read like a 20/20 special on TV...trying to make sense of a senseless act. The subject matter is so limited and speculative that reading the original 1992 article in the magazine would save one a lot of reading time. Some may like this book but I sure did not!

g
grace_lundeen
Mar 15, 2019

This book is an amazing piece of literature. Krakauer has a way of spinning McCandless’ story so it has no plot holes nor loose ends. Along with telling the story of Chris, Krakauer includes the bittersweet tales of other hikers who wanted to live on their own as well, and ultimately lost their lives because of it. Because “Into the Wild” does not just focus on one story, it would be easy to see how the story might jump around a lot. But, Krakauer knows just how to transition into each new page with no gaps. There was never a moment when I did not know what was going on in the story. The book has a little bit of almost every genre from adventure to romance, leaving no room for dislike. Overall, “Into the Wild” is an amazing book that should be read by everyone, as it will intrigue everyone who reads it.

o
Ojo99
Mar 05, 2019

One of the worst books I've ever read in my life. The author writes like a blogger that used a thesaurus to beef up the text. The story of Chris McCandless is infuriating. He threw away his life without giving a second thought to his family, and proceeded to freeze to death, thanks to his own stupidity. No matter how awful the story of McCandless was, it is made even worse by the author forcing in stories of his own adventures, that barely relate to the story at all. Overall a dry, boring, and taxing read.

t
thomas3lder
Feb 21, 2019

My brother told me that this book would be a good read. I took his word for it and highly regretted it. At first this book was quite interesting but the more I read the less interested it became. Near the end of the book I was struggling to pick it up.
Overall this book is about a person who just graduated college and ditched everything to go travel the united states. This part of the book was interesting until he reached Alaska. This is when the book started drag and it became a very dull book to read. If you are interested in the rough alaskan terrain this book is for you.

s
schmegu_at_hcplc
Dec 11, 2018

As an eleventh grade english teacher, this book was a required reading for my students. In all honesty, it was so ridiculous. My kids didn't care for it, and I could barely see how they were stretching it to fit their theme for the year of the American Dream. Honestly, I wouldn't recommend this unless you are a huge fan of Alaskan Bush People, or anything along those lines. If that's the case, you'll love this.

n
nick_canning
Dec 11, 2018

Nov 17- Dec 7th 2018 Nicholas Jackson
I learned and gained a new appreciation for those that live outside of the norms. Rebels who refuse to conform into what society tells them to be. I realised myself have always had a rebellious side and shared lot of Chris McCandless views. I feel that I sometimes too may have been born into the wrong century, I myself would not go to the extreme behaviour that Chris did. The sadness part for me was the fact that he was successful in his journeys he would have survived if he had a map, or if the river had not been flowing as much. Now more than ever I feel that people are consultly consuming themselves with anything people stay plugged into and want to distract themselves from ever listening to their inner child.
I having lived through the extreme conditions that Chris wanted his whole life to experience the sub-artic condition still like most Alaskans have little empathy for him. He and many others were foolish I know and was told from a very young age how you needed to have respect for the land if you choice to venture into it. The arctic is a unforgiving place death is looming overhead always, it is admire that Chris lasted 112 days. And it is even harder to accept that it was moldy seed that lead to his death. And had he survived only 19 more days he could have been rescued. The journal entries show that Chris wanted to start a family and life a normal-ish life had he crossed that river or had a map. Making it more sad.
I loved that Jon Krakaur gave his own experience of surviving his climb. And many other accounts of explorers that choose a life exiled from society. I feel a great amount of respect and appreciation for people like Felipe and my brother Tyler that choose a life style like Chris McCandless. The differences is purpose Tyler likes to drink and have sex and wants to
Knowing that Ryan went to that Fairbanks 142 bus

Most momeable moments from the book
The details of Chris’s borther in law having to tell his sister of Chris’s death made me cry. Seconaly the epilogue of Chris’s parents visting the bus made me cry even more. Billie(mother) left a first kit and a bible saying “I haven’t prayed since we lost him.”
Chris’s sister going to the church for hours looking for answers as her husband waitied in the car on the drive to see her parent. Leaving saying that God didn’t answer. She rembered being on the plane eating all the cheap shitty airplane not wanting to waste any because her brother straved.

r
Rbourgon
Nov 20, 2018

I really enjoyed this book for the story of McCandless. It tells the story of a well off young man who decided to give up everything and live a nomadic lifestyle which ultimately came to an end in Alaska. The book could do without all the side stories though and the story of the authors mountaineering adventure. This felt just like page fillers and while the author attempted to link his and other unrelated stories to that of McCandless I really saw no real correlation.

a
areyouover9000
Jun 22, 2018

Great.

l
Linyarai
Mar 07, 2018

I read this for the "A Biography" part of my 2018 reading challenge. I didn't enjoy it, I found it slow and his timeline was too scattered. I also think Chris McCandless was inept and unprepared and shouldn't have been out there in the first place.

t
TennisPanther
Oct 08, 2017

Love this story. Complex character.

a
alaina_the_gypsy
Aug 29, 2017

This book was quite fascinating with the nature of how it was presented with the gathered information of McCandless and his tragic story. I feel this book resonates well with those who are seeking adventure and a different way of living. However, Mccandless's journey can be quite extreme in trying to find the answers he is looking for. This is a good read for seeing different points of view on McCandless's story.

ArapahoeStaff15 Aug 23, 2017

Highly recommended for anyone who has felt lost in life or is looking for a different way of living. Also great for any adventure fans or avid hikers.

s
Sakura12
Jul 19, 2017

As a sophomore, I had to read and reread his book, and then proceeded to watch, and rewatch the movie, analyzing it shot by shot. I hated this book because of all that work associated with it. Being a college freshmen now and having willingly reread and rewatched 'Into the Wild,' I appreciate it more.

o
Orcacreative
Jun 09, 2017

This book is truly fascinating. For me, the highlight of the book is the 2015 add-on at the end, it brings a shroud of mystery to the biographical story. This book will echo with everyone who enjoys solitude, adventure and nature.

b
Blitzcrieg
Apr 28, 2017

Alaska seems to have a strange pull for many discontents and non-conformists. Perhaps it is a proving ground for those who strain against the normal constraints of modern society. Alaska remains truly wild and it exerted a magnetism for Chris McCandless who walked away from what appeared to be a secure and promising future for the quest of the unknown. Hopefully he was able to find something of what he sought before the tragic outcome. The book is a cautionary tale of what it takes to truly but successfully go 'into the wild'. A riveting and haunting true story.

m
Mmegood
Apr 18, 2017

This book was not my favorite book but I didn't hate it either. An interesting look at the life of a nomadic person who was well educated. He gave up his possessions and lived minimally and as a transient. Just when he may have decided to return to regular life his life ends thick in the Alaska bush.

c
connorkline11
Mar 28, 2017

I really enjoyed reading this book. It kept me on the edge of my seat for the most part. I thought that Jon Krakauer did a very good job telling the reader of his thoughts and experiences with explaining the way McCandless could have died. I thought it was a very interesting read and would definitely recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a good read.

r
Riddlereads
Feb 13, 2017

Krakauer takes an in-depth look at the circumstances that led to the death of Chris McCandless. He shares details that help clarify McCandless' state of mind as he went into the wilderness and makes it easier to empathize and understand his motivation.

b
becker
Jul 20, 2016

A good quick read if you like wilderness or survival type stories. Very interesting but also very somber.

j
Jen24
Jul 14, 2016

This book was very different from what I usually read, but I still enjoyed it. I was intrigued by Chris' story and even though I wasn't totally into the story I still enjoyed it and I would recommend everyone read a book like this sometime in their lifetime.


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